about csa

Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) was introduced in the United States in the 1980s and 90s as local, independent owner-operator farms were rapidly going out of business.  In this new alternative social and economic approach, the growers and the consumers provide mutual support and share the risks and benefits of food production. In practice, that means that if it is a bumper year for strawberries, members will enjoy the surplus.  If it is a hard year for broccoli, members will see less broccoli in their share. On our farm, it means that members will share in our bounty and be able to develop a relationship with their farm and farmers through visits, classes, optional work parties and sharing a meal at the end of the season.

why pay ahead

One of the challenging things about farming is the upfront cost. It’s a tremendous amount of money to buy seeds and amendments, especially for a farmer coming out of wintertime. As a member, we are in this together! Our role is to grow the food for all of our families, your role is to make sure we have the money we need to pay the bills. Most people don’t consider the seasonality of farm work, and therefore, farm income. Things are tight come February, and a little extra cash at this time makes the start of the season much less stressful.

the social justice share

For every five shares sold, Silverwell Farm will provide a share to a low-income person in our community who is working towards a more just and egalitarian society. We prioritize women of color, single mamas, activists/organizers, LGBTQ+.  We welcome donations to this fund which will directly provide more food to low-income members of our community.

our sliding scale

We want our food to be accessible to everyone. The low end of our pricing scale is the base level, which pays ourselves less than minimum wage and  covers all of our other expenses such as seeds, amendments, and overhead costs. The high end of the sliding scale pays us a living wage and leaves some money in the bank to start the next spring with ease, repair tools and equipment, improve infrastructure, and most importantly, provide cost-offset shares to our low income neighbors.